Sunday Reflection

In the wilderness Jesus did not engage with the devil’s temptations. He simply quoted the Word of God in scripture. God’s Word has power, even over the demons.

Jesus’ experience teaches us that there is nothing wrong with being tempted. It’s how we react to the temptation that matters. A short prayer or a quote from God’s Word will help us let it go. For example: ‘Lead me not into temptation’ or ‘I must forgive, not once but seventy times.

‘Know yourself!’ is an ancient piece of Greek wisdom. Do I know myself and my temptations? Am I a perfectionist, or lazy? Do I desire to get noticed and praised? Am I hoarding the gifts and talents God has given me instead of putting them at the service of others? Do I focus on the best in people, or get myself angry over their flaws? Do I love only those who love me? Have I a closed mind so that I miss out on the surprises and graces of each new situation? Do I judge others rather than try—as Ignatius suggests– to put a good interpretation on what they say or do? And so on. Where am I ignoring the grace God is offering me?

Jesus knows me better than I know myself: he loves me as I am. But he also works, often through others, to help me become aware of the ways I can spoil things. He wants to make me more compassionate and easier to get along with. I ask him, in the words of the liturgy, to help me grow in love.  

In the wilderness Jesus did not engage with the devil’s temptations. He simply quoted the Word of God in scripture. God’s Word has power, even over the demons.

Jesus’ experience teaches us that there is nothing wrong with being tempted. It’s how we react to the temptation that matters. A short prayer or a quote from God’s Word will help us let it go. For example: ‘Lead me not into temptation’ or ‘I must forgive, not once but seventy times.

‘Know yourself!’ is an ancient piece of Greek wisdom. Do I know myself and my temptations? Am I a perfectionist, or lazy? Do I desire to get noticed and praised? Am I hoarding the gifts and talents God has given me instead of putting them at the service of others? Do I focus on the best in people, or get myself angry over their flaws? Do I love only those who love me? Have I a closed mind so that I miss out on the surprises and graces of each new situation? Do I judge others rather than try—as Ignatius suggests– to put a good interpretation on what they say or do? And so on. Where am I ignoring the grace God is offering me?

Jesus knows me better than I know myself: he loves me as I am. But he also works, often through others, to help me become aware of the ways I can spoil things. He wants to make me more compassionate and easier to get along with. I ask him, in the words of the liturgy, to help me grow in love.  
Taken from Sacred Space, submitted by Aw.


This entry was posted in Sunday Reflection. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s