Sunday Reflection & Rector’s Corner

Sunday Reflection: This is the third Sunday in which we are reading through the Gospel of Mark. Last Sunday, Jesus’ disciples picked grain on the Sabbath and he cured a man’s hand on the Sabbath. In the text of the gospel that we skip over to get to this week’s reading, a large crowd gathers around Jesus because of his miraculous healings, and he appoints the twelve apostles. This week, Jesus’ teaching continues with a series of sayings.

These sayings might seem to be randomly thrown together at first, without much uniting them. But if you look carefully, you might see a pattern. The reading begins mid-sentence; if you started from Mark 3:19b, you would read, “Then [Jesus] went home [literally ‘to a house’]; and the crowd came together again…” The theme of house, home, and family run throughout this reading.

  • What is Jesus’ true home, and who are his true family?
  • When has the Church been your family, your “brother and sister and mother” (v. 35)? Is there a time when it has supported you and your family, or when it has supported you in a time of conflict in your family                                                                                                 (From Sermon that Works) 

Rector’s Corner: “STYLES AND TITLES” (The information below is from the Diocesan Communications Office)

We now have an archbishop in our diocese and questions about styles and titles have arrived. In the Anglican Communion archbishops employ the written style ‘The Most Reverend’ and are addressed as ‘Archbishop’ or ‘Your Grace.’ These styles and titles are used for both the Primate and Metropolitan Archbishops.

By convention, the names of bishops and archbishops always follow the title of their office: The Archbishop of New Westminster, the Most Reverend Melissa Skelton (use Christian and surname). Thereafter, Archbishop Skelton or the Archbishop.  Anglican archbishops are entitled to be preceded by a server carrying an archiepiscopal processional cross (with two bars instead of one) in liturgical processions. Retired archbishops ordinarily would revert to being styled “The Right Reverend”, although they may be appointed archbishop emeritus by their Province on retirement, in which case they retain the title archbishop and the style The Most Reverend, as a courtesy.

Practically: In the Prayers of the People: We pray for Melissa, our Archbishop and Metropolitan.

In formal speech: Archbishop Skelton, Your Grace.

In informal speech: Archbishop Melissa.

Written: The Most Reverend Melissa Skelton, Dear Archbishop Skelton,

Hope this would assist us in addressing our Archbishop.

The Venerable Louie Engnan

Rector

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Sunday Reflection & Rector’s Corner

Sunday Reflection:For the Pharisees, working during the Sabbath was a matter of life and death. Jesus’ priority was the people. To emphasize his convictions, Jesus asked the Pharisees, “Is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the Sabbath, to save or to kill?” He then healed before them the man whose hand was withered. Jewish law was clear: to heal was to work, and medical attention could only be given to those whose lives were endangered. The man with the withered hand could have waited, but Jesus would not allow another day of suffering for the man.
Jesus’ act is a demonstration of the purpose of our liturgy; the integral reason behind the external acts at the altar every Sunday. We could be steeped in elaborate rituals and colorful expressions of our faith, but if we remain blind and deaf to the plight of those who clamor for love and to the tears of those who are afflicted, we are as good as an empty church—we are a hollow excuse.
Jesus’ life was centered on service, a spontaneous and sacrificial call to challenge the bounds of religious legalism, a mission to make people’s lives new and to respond to them in their need. To him, the next ministry opportunity would begin with the next person he met.
  • How would you define religious legalism? How could we prevent ourselves from falling into a church of “dos and don’ts”?
  • In this Season of Pentecost, how could you respond to human need in loving service as enshrined in the Anglican Five Marks of Mission?                                                                   (From Sermon that Works)

Rector’s Corner

Dear Parishioners,

Praise be to our Father who is in heaven who have blessed us in the heavenly realms with spiritual blessings in Christ and guidance from the Holy Spirit.

I feel blessed to write to you to say thank you for the support you have given this ministry and to our parish congregation.

While I was away, your support both morally and spiritually was much appreciated to make sure that our mission reaches all those that God want us to reach. Thank you for your prayers of safe travel for my family and the warm welcome you all gave me.

Keep on praying for our ministry so that the will of God can be manifested in us as we preach the gospel to all corners of the world.

God bless you and thank you.

Yours in the Lord,

The Venerable Louie Engnan, Rector

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Sunday Reflection

  1. Of Faith in the Holy Trinity (Articles of Religion)There is but one living and true God, ever-lasting, without body, parts, or passions; of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness; the maker, and Preserver of all things both visible and invisible. And in unity of this Godhead there be three Persons, of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

Trinity Sunday: Athanasian Poetry

Today we celebrate an idea—an idea that represents our best understanding of the mystery and paradox of God: The Holy Trinity.  There is one and only one God; and this God is a trinity of persons.

There’s a delightful poem about the Trinity called “The Creed of St. Athanasius”.  Whoever wrote it (it wasn’t St. Athanasius) probably didn’t mean to write delightful poetry, but I do find it both delightful and poetic. Here are a few lines from the Creed of St. Athanasius:

“… we worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity; Neither confounding the Persons; nor dividing the Essence. For there is one Person of the Father; another of the Son; and another of the Holy Spirit. But the Godhead of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, is all one; the Glory equal, the Majesty coeternal. Such as the Father is; such is the Son; and such is the Holy Spirit. The Father uncreated; the Son uncreated; and the Holy Spirit uncreated. The Father unlimited; the Son unlimited; and the Holy Spirit unlimited. The Father eternal; the Son eternal; and the Holy Spirit eternal. And yet they are not three eternals; but one eternal. As also there are not three uncreated; nor three infinites, but one uncreated; and one infinite. So likewise the Father is Almighty; the Son Almighty; and the Holy Spirit Almighty. And yet they are not three Almighties; but one Almighty. So the Father is God; the Son is God; and the Holy Spirit is God. And yet they are not three Gods; but one God. So likewise the Father is Lord; the Son Lord; and the Holy Spirit Lord. And yet not three Lords; but one Lord… And in this Trinity none is before, or after another; none is greater, or less than another. But the whole three Persons are coeternal, and coequal. So that in all things, as aforesaid; the Unity in Trinity, and the Trinity in Unity, is to be worshipped…” (Br. Mark Brown, SSJE)

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Sunday Reflection & Rector’s Corner

What is Pentecost? Pentecost is the great festival that marks the birth of the Christian church by the power of the Holy Spirit. Pentecost means “fiftieth day” and is celebrated fifty days after Easter.

What happened on Pentecost? Ten days after Jesus ascended into heaven, the twelve apostles, Jesus’ mother and family, and many other of His disciples gathered together in Jerusalem for the Jewish harvest festival that was celebrated on the fiftieth day after Passover. While they were indoors praying, a sound like that of a rushing wind filled the house and tongues of fire descended and rested over each of their heads. This was the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on human flesh promised by God through the prophet Joel (Joel 2:28-29). The disciples were suddenly empowered to proclaim the gospel of the risen Christ. They went out into the streets of Jerusalem and began preaching to the crowds gathered for the festival. Not only did the disciples preach with boldness and vigor, but by a miracle of the Holy Spirit they spoke in the native languages of the people present, many who had come from all corners of the Roman Empire. This created a sensation. The apostle Peter seized the moment and addressed the crowd, preaching to them about Jesus’ death and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins. The result was that about three thousand converts were baptized that day. (You can read the Biblical account of Pentecost in Acts 2:1-41).

Why is Pentecost sometimes called “Whitsunday”?A tradition of some churches in ancient times was to baptize adult converts to the faith on Pentecost. The newly baptized catechumens would wear white robes on that day, so Pentecost was often called “Whitsunday” or “White Sunday” after these white baptismal garments. Many Christian calendars, liturgies, and hymnals (particularly those from the Episcopal/Anglican tradition) still use this term.

Rector’s Corner:I want to take a moment to extend a very warm welcome to our guest preacher this morning, The Reverend Paul Guiton. We’re delighted to have you here. I also encourage members of the congregation to extend your hospitality and fellowship to Paul. Enjoy the rest of your worship time together, and God bless you!

For your pastoral concerns, please get in touch with our office secretary, Natasha Kaweski at natasha.kaweski@gmail.com, or the church wardens to facilitate your request.  Thank you so much.

The Venerable Louie Engnan

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Sunday Reflection & Rector’s Corner

Jerusalem Sunday 2018: Dr. Patricia Bays

Jerusalem Sunday is observed on the 7th Sunday after Easter, the Sunday between Ascension Day and Pentecost, events that happened in that city two millennia ago. In 2018, that date May 13 is also the day in which we in North America observe Mothers’ Day. The Board of the Canadian Companions of the Diocese of Jerusalem chose a theme for this Sunday “Mothers of Jerusalem,” an opportunity to reflect on the role of women in the story of Jesus, the work of mothers and others in the search for peace and justice today, and the image of Jerusalem in Galatians 4:26 – “Jerusalem above; she is free and she is our mother,” the new Jerusalem, the city from whose centre flows the waters of life.

“We are reminded that this city is central to the faith of Christians. In this city our Lord Jesus Christ was crucified, died and rose again. Jerusalem is the place where the gift of the Spirit was given and the church was born. For the writers of the New Testament, Jerusalem represents the new creation, the life to come and the aspirations of all people, where God will wipe away all tears.” (Peace-ing Together Jerusalem by Clare Amos)

At the same time, we are called to acknowledge the love for Jerusalem in the hearts of those of other faiths, and to model Christian love in our relationship with them.

Rector’s Corner:I want to take a moment to extend a very warm welcome to our guest preacher this morning, The Reverend Gary Hamblin. We’re delighted to have you here. I also encourage members of the congregation to extend your hospitality and fellowship to Gary. Enjoy the rest of your worship time together, and God bless you!

For your pastoral concerns, please get in touch with our office secretary, Natasha Kaweski at natasha.kaweski@gmail.com, or the church wardens to facilitate your request.  Thank you so much.

The Venerable Louie Engnan

Notices

  • Diocesan Mission Conferencewill be on Saturday, May 26th, at Burnaby Mountain Secondary School. This event is open to all Anglicans in this Diocese. Please visit the Diocesan website for more details.
  • On Sunday, May 27, a Prayer Service for Healingwould be held at Zion Park Manor at 3:00pm. All Welcome to come.
  • Tri-parish picnic – Sunday, June 17 @ 10am at Bear Creek Park
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Sunday Reflection & Rector’s Corner

Saint John, Apostle and Evangelist:Today we honour Saint John the Apostle, a Galilean fisherman who was called with his brother James and followed Jesus to become “a fisher for people.” John and his brother were so impetuous in their behaviour that Jesus nicknamed them “Bo-aner’ges” or “Sons of thunder.” Nevertheless, with Peter and James, he was one of the three disciples that Jesus chose to have with him on those occasions when he wanted people he could trust. This side of John’s character is heightened if he was “the beloved disciple” mentioned in the Fourth Gospel — the disciple who lay closest to Jesus at the Last Supper and into whose care the crucified Lord entrusted his mother. According to the Book of Acts, John later became a pillar of the church at Jerusalem and shared the leadership with Peter.

A reliable tradition says that John eventually settled at Ephesus, a city on the Mediterranean coast of Asia Minor. There he superintended the Church and gathered a lively circle of students, who had great influence on Christian life and thought throughout the region. Out of this “community of the beloved disciple” came the Gospel and the three Letters which are attributed to John in the New Testament. These writings display a side of John which we would not expect from the other accounts of him. Instead of the impulsive “Son of thunder,” the Gospel and Letters of John reflect the mind of a fine theologian who meditated deeply on the mystery of Christ and expressed his understanding in a poetical manner. Many scholars have argued that John the fisherman-apostle and John the theologian-evangelist were really two different people. It has even been shown that the text of John’s Gospel passed through the hands of several editors before it reached the form in which we now know it. But scholars have also recognized that “the Johannine tradition” gives independent information about events in Jesus’ life which may be more accurate than some of the information available in the other three gospels. This suggests that the recollections and teachings of John, the fisherman turned apostle, did indeed provide the basis for the New Testament writings which bear his name. (For All the Saints, Anglican Church of Canada)

Rector’s CornerI want to take a moment to extend a very warm welcome to our guest preacher this morning, The Reverend Peter Smyth. We’re delighted to have you here. I also encourage members of the congregation to extend your hospitality and fellowship to Peter. Enjoy the rest of your worship time together, and God bless you!

For your pastoral concerns, please get in touch with our office secretary, Natasha Kaweski at natasha.kaweski@gmail.com, or the church wardens to facilitate your request.  Thank you so much.

The Venerable Louie Engnan

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Mother’s Day Jazz Concert 2018

Please see this link for more information

Mothers Day Jazz Concert 2018

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