Sunday Reflection

Sunday’s Reflection:  If you would visit our online Anglican church calendar, the second Sunday of Easter is traditionally known as “Low Sunday”, this is the Octave Day of Easter and should be celebrated accordingly. After today’s liturgies, the dismissal ends with a single Alleluia until the last day of Easter—the Day of Pentecost—when it is doubled again. But the term has gained another connotation referring to church attendance. Attendance on this Sunday is not as high as on Easter Day. It is by comparison low, hence Low Sunday.

It is often said that Thomas has been given a bad strike. For many centuries now, whenever this passage is read in our Sunday lectionary, the apostle Thomas has been known as “Doubting Thomas.” But Thomas was not present when Jesus appeared to the other apostles. And, just like Thomas later, they did not know who Jesus was until he showed them his wounded hands and sides. A week later, when Jesus appeared again, Thomas only needed to see what Jesus had already shown the other apostles. Jesus showed his wounds to Thomas. And Jesus allowed him to touch his wounds. That is when Thomas believed. Yet Jesus does not tell Thomas he was wrong, though he did remind Thomas not to doubt but believe.

Jesus also reminded Thomas how blessed are those who believe after merely hearing. We do not have the opportunity to investigate Jesus’ wounds. We have only read and heard that he is alive, and yet we still believe.

Do you think Thomas deserves the nickname “Doubting Thomas”? Why or why not? Was there ever a time when you doubted that the Lord was present?

Resources are from the Anglican Church of Canada and Sermons that Work.

Prayer: Risen Christ, for whom no door is locked, no entrance barred: open the doors of our hearts, so that we may seek the good of others and walk the joyful road of sacrifice and peace, to the praise of God, the Source of all life. Amen. Common Worship: Additional Collects (2004) alt. 

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